More Glacial Junk Science Journalism

From Live Science…

Records Melt Away on Greenland Ice Sheet

By Brett Israel, OurAmazingPlanet Staff Writer posted: 21 January 2011

The disappearing Greenland Ice Sheet set several records during an unusually long melt last year, according to a new study.

Running from April to mid-September, the melt season of 2010 was about a month longer than usual, said study team member Jason Box, a geographer and climatologist at Ohio State University.

[…]

Live Science

“The disappearing Greenland Ice Sheet”… Where in the heck did the author get the idea that the Greenland Ice Sheet was disappearing?

Greenland Ice Sheet Isopach Map (Wikipedia)

A recent publication by a team from TU Delft & JPL found that the Greenland ice sheet was melting at half the rate previously thought. They estimate that the Greenland ice sheet is losing ~230 gigatonnes (Gt) of ice per year. One Gt of water has a volume of 1 cubic km (km^3). 1 Gt of ice has a larger volume than 1 Gt of water… But, for the purpose of this exercise, we’ll assume 1 Gt of ice has a volume of 1 km^3.

If 1 Gt of ice has a volume of 1 km^3 and the current volume of the Greenland ice sheet is ~5 million km^3 and Greenland continues to melt at a rate of 230 km^3/yr over the next 90 years… The Greenland ice sheet will lose a bit more than 0.4% of its ice volume.~230 gigatonnes (Gt) of ice per year equates to about 0.005% of ice mass loss per year. At the current rate, it would take 1,000 years for the Greenland Ice Sheet to lose 5% of its volume.

The Earth’s climate was at least 2°C warmer during the Holocene Climatic Optimum and the Greenland Ice Sheet did not melt, disappear or destabilize…

Holocene Climate

The Earth’s climate was at least 2°C warmer and the Arctic was about 5°C warmer than it currently is during the Sangamonian (Eemian) interglacial. and the Greenland Ice Sheet did not melt, disappear or destabilize.

Greenland’s glaciation began during the Miocene, when the Earth’s climate was at least 5°C warmer than it currently is. It advanced rapidly after the Mid-Pliocene Warm Period.

Earth’s climate would have to warm back up to where it was in the mid-Miocene (~15 MYA) in order to destabilize the Greenland ice sheet…

Cenozoic Climate H/T Bill Illis

 

There is no scientific evidence to back up the assertion of a “disappearing Grrenland Ice Sheet.  For a detailed explanation as to why the Greenland ice sheet cannot collapse under any AGW scenario, see Ollier & Pain, 2009.

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2 Responses to “More Glacial Junk Science Journalism”

  1. Jackie Pratt Says:

    Thanks great article.
    Can you help to refute the stuff on this webpage?
    http://www.climate.org/topics/climate-change/debunking-climate-change-myths.html

  2. David Middleton Says:

    LazyTeenager on April 5, 2012 at 11:50 pm said:
    David says
    The Earth’s climate was at least 2°C warmer during the Holocene Climatic Optimum
    ———-
    This claim seems to be based on reading the graph but the graph is missing the last 100 years . Adding in the extra 100 years would add another 1C making the difference just 1C.

    I wrote and submitted this post about a year ago.  I noticed that error shortly after submitting it.  I noted the errata in my first comment to this post.

    Kobashi’s GISP2 reconstruction cover 960-1950 AD.

    A combination of Kobashi’s GISP2 reconstruction and regional instrumental data shows the modern warming in Greenland to be nearly identical to the Medieval Warm Period.

    There also seems to be some semantic jiggers pokery around the “disappearing Greenland ice sheet”. There are measurements of the ice sheet which are satellite-based cross-checked with field measurements. So David tries to tell us there is “no evidence”. Sorry not buying it.

    The glacial junk science journalist referred to the “disappearing Greenland ice sheet.” There’s no evidence that the Greenland ice sheet is disappearing.  Had article referred to the dynamically variable Greenland ice sheet, I wouldn’t have taken much issue with it, apart from the relevancy of records set relative to record length.

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